Tag Archives: georgia

APA 2014: Another Reminder Why We Do This

It is time for the APA conference once again. As I have written previously (and more eloquently than this quick blog scribble), each time I attend this conference it is worth asking the value of convening in person. I don’t automatically sign up every year; I could get CE credits with local events back in Washington, DC, or even via online webinars. And I am not currently involved in any committees or leadership, so I would not necessarily be missed if I chose not to be here.

And there are a number of challenges associated with attending, especially for the younger members of our profession. Taking four days away from our jobs is tough. It’s expensive. Our employers* may or may not pay for the trip and the registration fee. The only places that can accommodate 5,000+ people are quite anti-urban hotels and convention centers (this is the most flattering angle I could manage of the typical presentation room).

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The Georgia World Congress Center. All that’s missing is you.

But I’m in Atlanta, and glad again I made the decision to attend.

For this year, my focus is on paying it forward, to the students and other folks that are just entering their time as planners. I have been fortunate enough to have a number of people serve as mentors and informal guides to me. This was crucial as I applied to grad school and got it funded, assembled a strategy for job searching, reassessed my strengths and jumped to new positions, and so on. None of us made it to successful points in our careers alone, and that’s why I want to return the favor. APA has been helpfully set up a more formal mentoring program that matches us with students (and I encourage you to participate next year) seeking this kind of help. I will be meeting with two folks on that program.

Regardless of the reason, enjoy your time in Atlanta and the interactions that being present together allow.

* Disclaimer: my employer is not paying for me to be here this time, so I feel the challenge directly.

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